Mobile Clinics

A Journey HomeA Journey Home is the story of my mother’s experiences working as a nurse in a health clinic for the under-served in Ghana, West Africa. Click here to begin with the first entry of “The Journey Home”  My comments are in red.

CHAPTER 5C

From the third section of her March, 1990, newsletter to supporters. See the first installment of the newsletter here.

Greetings from Ghana,

This week we returned to Mile 14 Post,  the same village I visited on my first visit to Ghana last June (1989). In June three nurses saw 240 patients. This time three nurses saw 180 patients.

19.Truck.2We left home at 7 A.M. (twelve of us) with the big van and pick-up truck packed with medicines, dressings, lunches, and water. Two and half hours later we arrived to find a crowd of villagers to greet us.  Since healthcare is so limited in most villages, news of a clinic spreads to surrounding villages.  We worked almost seven hours with a brief lunch break; after a long hot day we were home by 6:30 P.M. The power was still off but at least we had water for a cold shower and a hot meal waiting for us.

Notice the van for travel, their nursing stations (under a tree). Mama is in the back, wearing a blue hat.

Notice the van for travel, their nursing stations (under a tree). Mama is in the back, wearing a blue hat.

Another view of this mobile clinic. Besides the nurses you can see Gabriel to the right, one of the evangelists.

Another view of this mobile clinic. Besides the nurses you can see Gabriel to the right, one of the evangelists.

The people seem so appreciative of our efforts. They brought plantains and cassava as gifts; so many willing hands were there to help us pack up to leave. Our plans are to make this a regular clinic, once or twice monthly, reaching out to surrounding small villages with an immunization program.

Next week we plan to make an overnight visit to Tamale, a village midway to the Northern region. A Christian brother reports that funds have been raised from the villagers for a clinic; Ghanaian nurses and facilities are available for a clinic. We have been invited to assist in establishing a clinic. Our visit will be to evaluate, consult with the chief (the leader of the village) as well as church leaders and then decide how we are able to assist. Our concern is to always be sure our work is done in the name and for the cause of Christ.

In April we have two mobile clinic scheduled. One will be in the Northern Region in Garinkuka, a dreadfully poor area. I have seen a video of a clinic held there in January by the Reynolds during their six weeks visit. It looked liked the scenes we see on TV (“Save the Children”). We will spend the night at a rest house, drive three hours, hold a clinic, drive back to the rest house for the night and home the next day. Remember us in special prayers, plsease, it will be an arduous trip.

This Scripture seems to be the foundation of their work:

Matthew 25: 35, 36     ‘I was hungry. And you gave me something to eat. I was thirsty. And you gave me something to drink. I was a stranger. And you invited me in. I needed clothes. And you gave them to me. I was sick. And you took care of me. I was in prison. And you came to visit me.’

She learned that each mobile clinic had it’s own challenges and rewards. But it was always clear — they were needed and appreciated. 

I am thankful Mama had the stamina and physical health to do this work.

JoyMartell  

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